Wrapper for running perf on part of a program.

Linux’s perf competes with early git for title of least-friendly Linux tool.  Because it’s tied to kernel versions, and the interfaces changes fairly randomly, you can never figure out how to use the version you need to use (hint: always use -g).

But when it works, it’s very useful.  Recently I wanted to figure out where bitcoind was spending its time processing a block; because I’m a cool kid, I didn’t use gprof, I used perf.  The problem is that I only want information on that part of bitcoind.  To start with, I put a sleep(30) and a big printf in the source, but that got old fast.

Thus, I wrote “perfme.c“.  Compile it (requires some trivial CCAN headers) and link perfme-start and perfme-stop to the binary.  By default it runs/stops perf record on its parent, but an optional pid arg can be used for other things (eg. if your program is calling it via system(), the shell will be the parent).

1 thought on “Wrapper for running perf on part of a program.”

  1. It doesn’t help that you need to specify –no-children on relatively recent perf to get any sensible output.

    It sometimes feels as though it’s maintained by people who never use it.

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